Claire's blog

Why we should celebrate the fracking moratorium - and fight for more

Guest post by Kim Hunter, Frack Free Scarborough (writing in personal capacity)

Late last Friday night, Britain's Tory government announced an immediate moratorium on fracking until it finds 'compelling new evidence' the industry won't have 'unacceptable impacts on the local community'.

Anti-fracking activists cried with relief, then uncorked the wine, told long-suffering family members they would finally spend quality time together and started organising well-side parties. And then they took to social media to question the Tories' integrity. 

They have none. 

Boris Johnson hasn’t suddenly become an ‘uncooperative crusty’ (as he called XR activists). He hasn't, after all, made 'people and planet before profit' the guiding principle of his election manifesto. The moratorium doesn’t include other forms of unconventional oil and gas, not even processes like acidisation, which in 2015 were excluded from the definition of fracking by political sleight of hand. The fracking moratorium falls into the same category as other populist pre-election measures.

But it is fracking that Johnson chose to sacrifice on the altar of his party's political ambition. He hasn't decided to renationalise the railways, or raise the minimum wage to £10 an hour. Fracking must fall because campaigners have so completely menaced the industry, so thoroughly countered its attempts to create positive PR, that it has become a political liability.

National Education Union votes in solidarity with climate strike students

 
The NEU teaching union has voted to stand in "full solidarity" with those who have been taking part in global protests, and called for a Just Transition.
Full text of motion with amendments included below.
 
Conference recognises that the latest UN climate report shows that: 
1. Without more rapid action, there will be at least a 3 degrees temperature rise by 2100; 
2. 1 degree rise above pre-industrial levels has already led to increasing fires, hurricanes, floods and droughts; 
3. The transition to a zero-carbon society to keep below a 1.5 degree increase is the most urgent problem facing humanity and is technically feasible; and 
4. The obstacles are entirely political. 

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